Support Union Test Prep

Support us and begin preparing Ad-free for your tests with
Union Test Prep.

At Union Test Prep, we are a small team dedicated to bringing the best test-prep material to you, free of cost. But we cannot do it without your support.

Support us today and start preparing for your test without the intrusion of ads.

Support Now

Recommended Immunization Schedule

How to Learn This

When I was studying for the NCLEX, I was dedicated to my flashcards. A term on the front, a definition on the back, and I was good to go. I carried them around everywhere because they were easy to make, convenient to whip out during the five minutes between ordering a latte and actually receiving it, and were effective. However, when I was trying to study the recommended immunization schedule for pediatrics up to age 6, I was stumped. How was I going to cram an entire chart onto a 5x3 index card? Luckily, I figured out a system: making the vaccination the term on the front of the card, and the recommended dates of administration the definition on the back.

What You Need to Know

Here are the required immunizations, with age of administration. Let’s break it down by vaccine. The bullet points help break up all the information into manageable chunks.

  • Hepatitis B (HepB): 1st dose administered at birth, 2nd dose administered at 1–2 months of age, and 3rd dose at 6–18 months

  • Rotavirus (RV): 1st dose at 2 months, and 2nd dose at 4 months

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Acellular Pertussis (DTaP): 1st dose at 2 months, 2nd dose at 4 months, 3rd dose at 6 months, 4th dose at 15–18 months

  • Haemophilus Influenzae B (HiB): 1st dose at 2 months, 2nd dose at 4 months, 3rd dose at 12–15 months

  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV): 1st dose at 2 months, 2nd dose at 4 months, 3rd dose at 6 months, 4th dose at 12–15 months

  • Poliovirus (IPV): 1st dose at 2 months, 2nd dose at 4 months, 3rd dose at 6–18 months, 4th dose at 4–6 years old

  • Influenza: Annually, beginning at 6 months

  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR): 1st dose at 12–15 months, 2nd dose at 4–6 years

  • Varicella (chicken pox): 1st dose at 12–15 months, 2nd dose at 4–6 years

And What’s the Point?

Now that we’ve presented the information, you may be asking, “Why is it important to know these timelines?” Two big parts of being a nurse are public health and education. Vaccinations play a huge role in both of these things. By understanding the recommended schedule, you can help your patients make educated decisions for themselves and their families, as well as protect the public by decreasing the occurrence of preventable diseases.

Recommended Immunization Schedule

Recent Posts

Urinalysis: What’s Tested and Why?

Urinalysis: What’s Tested and Why? Urinalysis is a test that examines …

Where Do Nurses Make the Most Money?

When searching for a nursing job, many nurses will look for a combinati…

What Is Toxic Shock Syndrome?

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a rare disease where an increase of bacte…


Keep Reading

National Council Licensure Examination-Practical Nurse® Blog

The Differences between Tylenol™ and Motrin™

National Council Licensure Examination-Practical Nurse® Blog

Urinalysis: What’s Tested and Why?

National Council Licensure Examination-Practical Nurse® Blog

What Is Sepsis?